Author Topic: DID  (Read 721 times)

christopherjohn

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DID
« on: September 02, 2013, 12:03:52 PM »
hiiiiiiii


how to use voip with direct inward dialing?................

arjun.datasoft

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Re: DID
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2013, 10:32:44 PM »
Hi,

VoipSwitch and its IVR module can work with DIDs, i.e. virtual phone numbers delivered through internet directly from provider to the switch. For example if you want to establish an access number in UK you can rent a local phone number from desired geographical location (or national or toll free number) and have required number of channels associated with the number, so when your customers dial the number their calls will be instantaneously forwarded through Internet to your VoipSwitch which in turn will carry out the programmed IVR scenario. This IP based approach in the IVR module allows for easy deployment of multiple access numbers in various geographical locations without high capital expenditures in equipment. If still for some reasons you have to connect to local telecom company in order to setup an access number you will need a gateway with proper physical interface (E1/T1, analogue, GSM..).

Thanks

rahesh.datasoft

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Re: DID
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2013, 08:33:20 AM »
hai

DID Service Providers, convert the analog to digital and provide these DID numbers over the Internet, with SIP or IAX2.
You buy the number, and send it straight to your sip address, and you are good to go.
The call will then come to your IPPBX as a real phone line. Then you can use as your phone number, and route it to your IVR or direct extension.


Thanks

melby@datasoft.ws

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Re: DID
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2013, 02:44:42 AM »
Hello,


So DID ("direct inward dialing") was invented as a way to re-use a limited number of physical phone lines to handle calls to different published numbers. In a business with DID, the phone company uses DID signalling to identify the number they are about to connect to the business's PBX. Historically, this was done by pulsing the last 3 or 4 digits of the number being dialed before connecting the number. The PBX would use these DID digits to switch the call to the right recipient.

In modern PBX's, typically, digital methods (example: PRI) are used to do the same thing, ie. supply the "called party" information. But many business's still have old PBX's which use the analog signalling I mentioned before. The type of telephone lines used for analog DID are different than regular home telephone lines. Usually, battery voltage is supplied by the business PBX instead of the telco. Also, the telco signals a new call by bridging the line instead of by ringing the line. The receiving PBX signals back that it's ready to take the call by momentarily reversing polarity of the voltage on the line (this is called "winking" the line)

Thanks,
Melby.