Author Topic: SNAPSHOT  (Read 1066 times)

paulstephen

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SNAPSHOT
« on: August 05, 2013, 01:20:39 PM »
Hello,

What snap shot means and how we use it in vmware?

Thanks..

aslamk

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Re: SNAPSHOT
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2013, 01:42:18 PM »
Hi,

Suppose you have installed virtual win 07 OS with no application installed.

Now you have taken snap shot of win07 os.After that you install some applications on win 07.

Now you take a snap shot of win07.Now you have to jumb back to initial win07 having no application installed.

so this is possible if you taken snap shots. So in this way you can access both win 7.

thanks.

akash.datasoft

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Re: SNAPSHOT
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2013, 01:37:43 AM »
What is a snapshot?

A snapshot preserves the state and data of a virtual machine at a specific point in time.
The state includes the virtual machine’s power state (for example, powered-on, powered-off, suspended).
The data includes all of the files that make up the virtual machine. This includes disks, memory, and other devices, such as virtual network interface cards.
A virtual machine provides several operations for creating and managing snapshots and snapshot chains. These operations let you create snapshots, revert to any snapshot in the chain, and remove snapshots. You can create extensive snapshot trees.

In VMware Infrastructure 3 and vSphere 4.x, the virtual machine snapshot delete operation combines the consolidation of the data and the deletion of the file. This caused issues when the snapshot files are removed from the Snapshot Manager, but the consolidation failed. This left the VM still running on snapshots, and the user may not notice until the datastore is full.


thanks
akash.datasoft.ws

nidhinpereira

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Re: SNAPSHOT
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2014, 02:27:18 AM »


A VMware snapshot is a copy of the virtual machine's disk file (VMDK) at a given point in time. Snapshots provide a change log for the virtual disk and are used to restore a VM to a particular point in time when a failure or system error occurs. Snapshots alone do not provide backup.

Any data that was writable on a VM becomes read-only when the snapshot is taken. VMware administrators can take multiple snapshots of a VM to create multiple possible point-in-time restore points. When a VM reverts to a snapshot, current disk and memory states are deleted and the snapshot becomes the new parent snapshot for that VM. The snapshot file cannot exceed the size of the original disk file, and it requires some overhead disk space. Snapshots will grow rapidly with high disk-write activity volume. Most snapshots are deleted within an hour and VMware recommends deleting snapshots within 24 hours.

shajahan

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Re: SNAPSHOT
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2014, 03:16:08 AM »
What is a snapshot?

A snapshot preserves the state and data of a virtual machine at a specific point in time.
The state includes the virtual machine’s power state (for example, powered-on, powered-off, suspended).
The data includes all of the files that make up the virtual machine. This includes disks, memory, and other devices, such as virtual network interface cards.
A virtual machine provides several operations for creating and managing snapshots and snapshot chains. These operations let you create snapshots, revert to any snapshot in the chain, and remove snapshots. You can create extensive snapshot trees.

swetha

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Re: SNAPSHOT
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2014, 07:26:52 AM »
Hi,

Suppose you have installed virtual win 07 OS with no application installed.

Now you have taken snap shot of win07 os.After that you install some applications on win 07.

Now you take a snap shot of win07.Now you have to jumb back to initial win07 having no application installed.

so this is possible if you taken snap shots. So in this way you can access both win 7.

thanks.

nidhinpereira

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Re: SNAPSHOT
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2014, 07:36:35 PM »
The snapshot feature is most useful when you want to preserve the state of the virtual machine so you can return to the same state repeatedly.

To simply save the current state of your virtual machine, then pick up work later with the virtual machine in the same state it was when you stopped, suspend the virtual machine. For details, see Using Suspend and Resume.

You can take a snapshot of a virtual machine at any time and revert to that snapshot at any time.

You can take a snapshot while a virtual machine is powered on, powered off or suspended. A snapshot preserves the virtual machine just as it was when you took the snapshot - the state of the data on all the virtual machine's disks and whether the virtual machine was powered on, powered off or suspended.

swetha

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Re: SNAPSHOT
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2014, 08:13:20 PM »
hii,

A snapshot preserves the state and data of a virtual machine at a specific point in time.
The state includes the virtual machine’s power state (for example, powered-on, powered-off, suspended).
The data includes all of the files that make up the virtual machine. This includes disks, memory, and other devices, such as virtual network interface cards.
A virtual machine provides several operations for creating and managing snapshots and snapshot chains. These operations let you create snapshots, revert to any snapshot in the chain, and remove snapshots. You can create extensive snapshot trees.

In VMware Infrastructure 3 and vSphere 4.x, the virtual machine snapshot delete operation combines the consolidation of the data and the deletion of the file. This caused issues when the snapshot files are removed from the Snapshot Manager, but the consolidation failed. This left the VM still running on snapshots, and the user may not notice until the datastore is full.

Thanks.