Author Topic: vnc  (Read 519 times)

hameedkm

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vnc
« on: December 15, 2014, 07:52:20 PM »
Hi,

What is vnc?

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Hameed

afsalabdulla

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Re: vnc
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2014, 07:53:08 PM »
Hi,

vnc or virtual network computing is a way computing remote computer in linux world.when you connect a vnc client to a remote computer using vnc server we an take the full acces of that client computer.
to check installed or not
rpm -qa | grep vnc
configuration file
vi /etc/sysconfig/vncservers


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afsal

adamjames

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Re: vnc
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2014, 01:54:46 AM »
In computing, Virtual Network Computing (VNC) is a graphical desktop sharing system that uses the Remote Frame Buffer protocol (RFB) to remotely control another computer. It transmits the keyboard and mouse events from one computer to another, relaying the graphical screen updates back in the other direction, over a network

jaswin.datasoft

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Re: vnc
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2014, 04:11:26 AM »
Virtual Network Computing (VNC) is a graphical desktop sharing system that uses the Remote Frame Buffer protocol (RFB) to remotely control another computer. It transmits the keyboard and mouse events from one computer to another, relaying the graphical screen updates back in the other direction, over a network.[1]

VNC is platform-independent There are clients and servers for many GUI-based operating systems and for Java. Multiple clients may connect to a VNC server at the same time. Popular uses for this technology include remote technical support and accessing files on one's work computer from one's home computer, or vice versa.

VNC was originally developed at the Olivetti & Oracle Research Lab in Cambridge, United Kingdom. The original VNC source code and many modern derivatives are open source under the GNU General Public License.


There are a number of variants of VNC[2] which offer their own particular functionality; e.g., some optimised for Microsoft Windows, or offering file transfer (not part of VNC proper), etc. Many are compatible (without their added features) with VNC proper in the sense that a viewer of one flavour can connect with a server of another; others are based on VNC code but not compatible with standard VNC.

shukoorpa9

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Re: vnc
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2014, 04:36:58 AM »
Hi

VNC is a graphical desktop sharing system that uses the Remote Frame Buffer protocol (RFB) to remotely control another computer. It transmits the keyboard and mouse events from one computer to another, relaying the graphical screen updates back in the other direction, over a network

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adamjames

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Re: vnc
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2014, 01:27:50 AM »

    The VNC server is the program on the machine that shares its screen. The server passively allows the client to take control of it.
    The VNC client (or viewer) is the program that watches, controls, and interacts with the server. The client controls the server.
    The VNC protocol (RFB protocol) is very simple, based on one graphic primitive from server to client ("Put a rectangle of pixel data at the specified X,Y position") and event messages from client to server.

adamjames

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Re: vnc
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2014, 01:01:23 AM »
VNC by default uses TCP port 5900+N, where N is the display number (usually :0 for a physical display). Several implementations also start a basic HTTP server on port 5800+N to provide a VNC viewer as a Java applet, allowing easy connection through any Java-enabled web browser. Different port assignments can be used as long as both client and server are configured accordingly.