Author Topic: Semantic Gap  (Read 386 times)

shajahan

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Semantic Gap
« on: September 11, 2015, 02:30:24 PM »
What is semantic gap?

Defining a useful channel involves both understanding the applications requirements and recognizing the limitations of the underlying technology. The gap between what applications expects and what the underlying technology can provide is called semantic gap.

siljy.datasoft

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Re: Semantic Gap
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2015, 11:20:21 PM »
hii

The semantic gap characterizes the difference between two descriptions of an object by different linguistic representations, for instance languages or symbols. In computer science, the concept is relevant whenever ordinary human activities, observations, and tasks are transferred into a computational representation.
Thanks

santhoshidatasoft

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Re: Semantic Gap
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2016, 01:51:00 AM »
The semantic gap characterizes the difference between two descriptions of an object by different linguistic representations, for instance languages or symbols. According to Hein, the semantic gap can be defined as "the difference in meaning between constructs formed within different representation systems".[1] In computer science, the concept is relevant whenever ordinary human activities, observations, and tasks are transferred into a computational representation.[2][3][1]

More precisely the gap means the difference between ambiguous formulation of contextual knowledge in a powerful language (e.g. natural language) and its sound, reproducible and computational representation in a formal language (e.g. programming language). Semantics of an object depends on the context it is regarded within.

hruthika

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Re: Semantic Gap
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2016, 02:42:38 AM »
The difference between the complex operations performed by high-level language constructs and the simple ones provided by computer instruction sets. It was in an attempt to try to close this gap that computer architects designed increasingly complex instruction set computers.